EBBH4007 – Reading Critically & Writing Scholarly

EBBH4007 Reading Critically & Writing Scholarly
Department of Curriculum and Instruction – School of Education – Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University
Fall 2017 – Tuesday 09:00 @ Room E4-432 (Office Hour: 12:00 – 15:00)


(1) Course Description
This course is about two related skills: Reading and writing. The development of this course is rooted in my observation in the graduate school: The graduate students cannot properly read scientific texts and cannot write scholarly. They start their scholar adventure without being instructed adequately how to read critically and write scientifically. This is the starting point for our course. In this course, you will first learn how to read critically. This includes defining learning, explaining how reading works, models of reading, becoming a strategic reader, reading assessment. In the second part, you will learn to write scholarly. This skill ranges from forming a sentence to composing a paper. Learning, for me, is action oriented. It is accomplished best when knowledge is translated into action, i.e., when theory is transferred into application, in particular learning contexts. That is to say, it is learned more effectively when you can transfer your knowledge into practical competencies for different situations. Following this pragmatic principle, this course will emphasize hands-on activities during the semester. In a typical practical activity, you are supposed to reconstruct what you understand from the theoretical discussions. In addition to the hands-on activities, the primary teaching method is the theoretical discussions and questions/answers. Also please make sure that you read the assigned texts and answer the questions before coming to the classes.

(2) Objectives
By the end of the semester, you will be able to (1) first read a scientific text and then (2) write a scholar paper individually.

(3) Course Requirements
Firstly you are required to participate in all of the sessions. It is my responsibility to develop the curriculum, deliver the content and facilitate your learning. However, the more you participate in the discussions, take an active role in the class requirements, hold each other accountable for your learning, the more we will enjoy from our sessions and make most of the texts, discussions, field exercises. In addition to the class participation, you are required to write a metareview research paper. Each week you will be assigned to complete one part of your assignment. At the end of the semester, you will email your assignment (by December 29, 2017 Friday at 17:30).

(4) Course Textbooks

Arnaudet, M. L., & Barrett, M. E. (1990). Paragram development: A guide for students of English. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
Clark, I. L. (2003). Concepts in composition: Theory and practice in the teaching of writing. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University.
Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan.
Smalley, R. L., & Ruetten, M. K. (1995). Refining composition skills: Rhetoric and grammar. Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle.


Week 1: Part A: Introduction to Reading I

Readings:
None

Activities:
(1) You will write your first text by introducing yourself. On a piece of paper, you are required to talk about yourself.


Week 2: Learning audience
This week is about audience. In this session, you will learn how to address to a specific audience. Before you start writing scholarly/scientifically, you are supposed to learn how to organize your words according to the audience.

Activities:
(1) Individual work: Introduce yourself on a piece of paper without any particular audience.
(2) Individual work: Introduce yourself to your mother or father on a piece of paper.
(3) Individual work: Introduce yourself to your prospective employer in an interview.

Assignment:
(1) Define curriculum. Explain what curriculum means. Your audience in your work must be the teachers in your school.
(2) Define curriculum again. This time try to explain what curriculum means to a first grade student (aged around 6-7).
(3) Please try to answer the following questions while you observe your reading habits: What do you read during a day? Where, when, for how long, at what hour do you read? In what languages?

Readings:
(1) Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University. – Chapters 1 & 2
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Chapter 1

Activities:
(1) Individual work: What do you read during a day? You will list the texts that you read during a day: Where do you read them? In what language(s)?
(2) Pair work: On a piece of work, you will create a text for a specific context. Then, you will rewrite this text for a different context. Then, you will discuss the differences.
(3) Pair work: Discuss the reason why reading is crucial? You will list the reasons. We will rank them together.
(4) Class discussion: For what reasons do we read? What goals?
(5) Individual work: What is reading? You will write the processes in a reading activity? What happens when you read?


Week 3: Foundations of Reading
This week is about reading. You will learn what it means to read. Reading as a skill. Reading as a habit. Reading as a profession.

Activities:
(1) Class discussion: We will start our session by talking about your reading habits. We will try to cover the following question: What do you read? What sorts of texts? When do you read? For how long? In what languages? In what forms? Traffic signs? Online? Books? Magazines? Messages?
(2) Class discussion: We will try to answer the following question: For what reasons do you read? How can you make a difference between reading scientifically and reading for other purposes?
(3) Writing exercice: On a piece of paper you will start a short story. Your friends will continue your story. We will be done with your story when everyone completes the story.
(4) Class discussion: What is curriculum? How can we define curriculum?

(1) Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University. – Chapters 3, 4 & 5


Week 4: Part A: Developing Comprehension Skill I

(1) Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University. – Chapters 10 & 11
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Part I Chapters 2 & 3


Week 5: Part A: Developing Comprehension Skill II

(1) Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University. – Chapters 12 & 13
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Part I Chapters 4 & 5


Week 6: Part A: Expanding Comprehension Skill I

(1) Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University. – Chapters 14 & 15
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Part II Chapters 1 & 2


Week 7: Part A: Expanding Comprehension Skill II

(1) Grabe, W. (2009). Reading in a second language: Moving from theory to practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University. – Chapters 16 & 17
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Part II Chapters 4, 5 & 6


Week 8: Part B: Sentence Development

(1) Arnaudet, M. L., & Barrett, M. E. (1990). Paragram development: A guide for students of English. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. – Chapters 1 & 2
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Part II Chapters 7 & 8


Week 9: Part B: Enumeration

(1) Arnaudet, M. L., & Barrett, M. E. (1990). Paragram development: A guide for students of English. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. – Chapters 3 & 4
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Part II Chapters 9 & 10


Week 10: Part B: Cause and Effect

(1) Arnaudet, M. L., & Barrett, M. E. (1990). Paragram development: A guide for students of English. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. – Chapter 5
(2) Levine, A., Oded, B., & Statman, S. (1985). Build it up: An advanced course in ESL/EFL reading comprehension. New York: Macmillan. – Part II Chapters 11 & 12
(3) Clark, I. L. (2003). Concepts in composition: Theory and practice in the teaching of writing. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. – Chapter 4


Week 11: Part B: Comparison and Contrast

(1) Arnaudet, M. L., & Barrett, M. E. (1990). Paragram development: A guide for students of English. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. – Chapters 6 & 7
(2) Clark, I. L. (2003). Concepts in composition: Theory and practice in the teaching of writing. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. – Chapter 6


Week 12: Part B: From Paragraph to Composition I

(1) Arnaudet, M. L., & Barrett, M. E. (1990). Paragram development: A guide for students of English. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. – Chapter 8
(2) Clark, I. L. (2003). Concepts in composition: Theory and practice in the teaching of writing. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. – Chapter 7


Week 13: Part B: From Paragraph to Composition II

(1) Smalley, R. L., & Ruetten, M. K. (1995). Refining composition skills: Rhetoric and grammar. Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle. Chapter 6, 8 & 9


Week 14: Part B: From Paragraph to Composition III

(1) Smalley, R. L., & Ruetten, M. K. (1995). Refining composition skills: Rhetoric and grammar. Boston, MA: Heinle & Heinle. Chapter 10, 11 & 12