EGPO5025 Qualitative Methods in Educational Research

EGPO5025 – Qualitative Methods in Educational Research
Department of Curriculum and Instruction – School of Education – Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University
Fall 2017 – Tuesday 15:40 @ Room E4-432 (Office Hour: 12:00 – 15:00)


(1) Course Description
This course is an introduction to the qualitative research methods used in the educational research. It includes the theoretical discussion and practical implementation of the following research methods: (1) interviews, (2) observation, (3) document analysis and (4) discourse analysis. The course will start with the discussion about the theoretical foundations of quantitative research, including the shift in paradigms, the roots of the drastic change in making familiar unfamiliar and a brief talk in the historical development of qualitative look at the research in the social sciences. After talking about the sampling procedure, ethical concerns and the basics of qualitative research, the course will continue with first the theoretical foundation of the research methods and then the implementation of those methods in a relatively smaller environment. The final discussion will cover the trustworthiness and transparency of qualitative research methods. Learning, for me, is action oriented. It is accomplished best when knowledge is translated into action, i.e., when theory is transferred into application, in particular learning contexts. That is to say, it is learned more effectively when you can transfer your knowledge into practical competencies for different situations. Following this pragmatic principle, this course will emphasize hands-on activities during the semester. In a typical practical activity, you are supposed to reconstruct what you understand from the theoretical discussions. In addition to the hands-on activities, the primary teaching method is the theoretical discussions and questions/answers. Also please make sure that you read the assigned texts and answer the questions before coming to the classes.

(2) Objectives
By the end of the semester, you will be able to (1) firstly explain the paradigmatic shift from positivistic to interpretive perspective towards research, (2) briefly explain the basics of a qualitative research proposal, (3) efficiently list the ethical concerns and principles before submitting a qualitative research proposal, (4) individually conduct an interview, an observation, a document analysis and a sample of discourse analysis in a smaller environment, and (5) write an effective qualitative research paper.

(3) Course Requirements
Firstly you are required to participate in all of the sessions. It is my responsibility to develop the curriculum, deliver the content and facilitate your learning. However, the more you participate in the discussions, take an active role in the class requirements, hold each other accountable for your learning, the more we will enjoy from our sessions and make most of the texts, discussions, field exercises. In addition to the class participation, you are required to write a qualitative research paper. Each week you will be assigned to complete one part of your assignment. At the end of the semester, you will email your assignment (by December 29, 2017 Friday at 17:30).


Week 1: Introduction I: Defining Basic Terms

There is no assigned reading for this week. There will be a class discussion on the definitions and perspectives. The questions during the session cover (1) what kind of research experiences you have had so far, (2) how you define science, research, ethics, culture, and education, (3) what you have heard/read/talked about the term qualitative, qualitative research, and paradigms, and (4) how you would you define the term qualitative or qualitative research on your own.


Week 2: Introduction II: Paradigmatic Change in Social Research

This week is about the fundamentals of doing research. Before we start discussing about doing qualitative research, we will cover the basics of doing research in general.

Activities:
(1) Class discussion: How does one start doing a research? What are the charactertistics of a good research question?
(2)
(2) Individual work: You are required to write 3 research questions for this course. One of them will be the research question for your project.

Readings:
(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapters 1 & 2
(2) Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. – Chapter 1
(3) Guba, E. G., & Lincoln, Y. S. (2005). Paradigmatic controversies, contradictions, and emerging confluences. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(4) Phillips, D. C. (1983). After the wake: Postpositivistic educational thought. Educational Researcher, 12(5), 4-12.
(5) Blumer, H. (1954). What is wrong with social theory? American Sociological Review, 19(1), 3-10.
(6) Fraenkel, J. R., & Wallen, E. W. (2009.) How to design and evaluate research in education. New York: McGraw-Hill Companies. – Chapter 2


Week 3: Ethics & Politics in Qualitative Research

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 5
(2) Marshall, C., & Rossman, G. B. (2011). Designing qualitative research (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. – Chapter 3
(3) Christian, C. G. (2005). Ethics and politics in qualitative research. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(4) Clifford, J. (1983). On ethnographic authority. Representations, 2, 118-146.
(5) Darlington, Y., & Scott, D. (2002). Qualitative research in practice: stories from the field. Crows Nest: Allen & Unwin.


Week 4: Basics of Qualitative Research I: Design

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 3
(2) Marshall, C., & Rossman, G. B. (2011). Designing qualitative research (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. – Chapter 2
(3) Clifford, J. (1986). Introduction: Partial truths. In J. Clifford & G. E. Marcus (Eds.), Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography. Berkeley, CA: University of California.
(2) Gibson, W. J., & Brown, A. (2009). Working with qualitative data. London: Sage. – Chapter 4


Week 5: Basics of Qualitative Research II: Sampling

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapters 4 & 6
(2) Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. – Chapter 4


Week 6: Methods I: Interviews

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 7
(2) Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. – Chapter 5
(3) Fontana, A., & Frey, J. H. (2005). The interview: From natural stance to political involvement. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(4) Mishler, E. G. (1986). Standard practice. In E. G. Mishler, Research interviewing: Context and narrative. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University.


Week 7: Methods II: Focus Groups

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 8
(2) Mishler, E. G. (1986). The joint construction of meaning. In E. G. Mishler, Research interviewing: Context and narrative. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University.
(3) Morgan, D. L. (1997). Focus groups as qualitative research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(4) Emerson, R. M., & Pollner, M. (1988). On the uses of members’ responses to researchers’ accounts. Human Organization, 47, 189-198.
(5) Mathison, S. (1988). Why triangulate? Educational Researcher, 17(2), 13-17.


Week 8: Methods III: Observation

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 9
(2) Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. – Chapter 6
(3) Angrosino, M. V. (2005). Recontextualizing observation: Ethnography, pedagogy, and the prospects for a progressive political agenda. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(4) Erickson, F. (1985). Qualitative methods in research on teaching. East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University.


Week 9: Methods IV: Document Analysis

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 10
(2) Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. – Chapter 7
(3) Bowen, G. A. (2009). Document analysis as a qualitative research method. Qualitative Research Journal, 9(2), 27-40.
(4) Perakyla, A. (2005). Analyzing talk and text. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(5) Gibson, W. J., & Brown, A. (2009). Working with qualitative data. London: Sage. – Chapter 5


Week 10: Methods V: Discourse Analysis

(1) Paltridge, B. (2012). Discourse analysis: An introduction (2nd ed.). London: Bloomsbury – Chapter 1
(2) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 2
(3) Fairclough, N. L. (1985). Critical and descriptive goals in discourse analysis. Journal of Pragmatics, 9, 739-763.
(4) Lazaraton, A. (2002). Quantitative and qualitative approaches to discourse analysis. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 22, 32-51.
(5) Macbeth, D. (2003). Hugh Mehan’s Learning Lessons reconsidered: On the differences between the naturalistic and critical analysis of classroom discourse. American Educational Research Journal, 40(1), 239-280.
(6) Brown, B. A. (2006). ‘‘It Isn’t No Slang That Can Be Said about This Stuff’’: Language, identity, and appropriating science discourse. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 43(1), 96-126.
(7) Fine, M. (1987). Silencing in public schools. Language Arts, 64(2), 157-174.


Week 11 Working with Qualitative Data

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 12
(2) Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. – Chapter 8
(3) Gibson, W. J., & Brown, A. (2009). Working with qualitative data. London: Sage. – Chapters 7, 8 & 11
(4) Marshall, C., & Rossman, G. B. (2011). Designing qualitative research (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. – Chapter 8


Week 12: Transparency in Qualitative Research

(1) Yıldırım, A., & Şimşek, H. (2013). Sosyal bilimlerde nitel araştırma yöntemleri (9th ed.). Ankara: Seçkin – Chapter 13
(2) Merriam, S. B. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. – Chapter 9
(3) Denzin, N. K. (1978). The research act: A theoretical introduction to sociological methods. New York: McGraw Hill. – Chapter 4
(4) Eisner, E. (1992). Objectivity in educational research. Curriculum Inquiry, 22(1), 9-15.


Week 13: Writing a Qualitative Paper I

(1) Marshall, C., & Rossman, G. B. (2011). Designing qualitative research (5th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. – Chapters 9 & 10
(2) Denzin, N. K. (2009). Qualitative inquiry under fire: Toward a new paradigm dialogue. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast. – Chapter 12
(3) Richardson, L. St Pierre, E. A. (2005). Writing: A method of inquiry. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.


Week 14: Writing a Qualitative Paper II

(1) Deutscher, I. (1966). Words and deeds: Social science and social policy. Social Problems, 13(3), 235-254.
(2) Deyhle, D. (1986). Break dancing and breaking out: Anglos, Utes, and Navajos in a border reservation high school. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 17(2), 111-127.
(3) Gibson, W. J., & Brown, A. (2009). Working with qualitative data. London: Sage. – Chapter 12
(4) Hughes, C. (2003). Developing informed practice for disseminating qualitative research. London: Open University. – Chapter 9
(5) Peshkin, A. (1988). Understanding complexity: A gift of qualitative inquiry. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 19(4), 416-424.