EGPO5041 Introduction to Discourse Analysis

EGPO5041 Introduction to Discourse Analysis
Department of Curriculum and Instruction – School of Education – Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University
Fall 2017 – Monday 10:00 @ Room E4-432 (Office Hour: 12:00 – 15:00)


(1) Course Description
This course is an introduction to discourse and discourse analysis. It includes the theoretical discussion of the following discourse approaches: (1) speech act, (2) interactional sociolinguistics, (3) the ethnography of communication, (4) pragmatics, (5) conversation analysis/ethnomethodology, (6) variation analysis and (7) critical discourse analysis. Before talking about these approaches to discourse, the class discussions will focus on the foundations of social theory. The first session will cover the readings by Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber. The second session will cover the early ethnographic studies by Malinowski, Geertz and Levi-Strauss. Learning, for me, is action oriented. It is accomplished best when knowledge is translated into action, i.e., when theory is transferred into application, in particular learning contexts. That is to say, it is learned more effectively when you can transfer your knowledge into practical competencies for different situations. Following this pragmatic principle, this course will emphasize hands-on activities during the semester. In a typical practical activity, you are supposed to reconstruct what you understand from the theoretical discussions. In addition to the hands-on activities, the primary teaching method is the theoretical discussions and questions/answers. Also please make sure that you read the assigned texts and answer the questions before coming to the classes.

(2) Objectives
By the end of the semester, you will be able to (1) firstly explain the foundations of social theory (Marx, Durkeim and Weber), (2) briefly explain the term discourse and discourse analysis, (3) briefly talk about the different approaches to discourse analysis, (4) individually conduct a sample of discourse analysis in a smaller environment, and (5) write an effective research paper.

(3) Course Requirements
Firstly you are required to participate in all of the sessions. It is my responsibility to develop the curriculum, deliver the content and facilitate your learning. However, the more you participate in the discussions, take an active role in the class requirements, hold each other accountable for your learning, the more we will enjoy from our sessions and make most of the texts, discussions, field exercises. In addition to the class participation, you are required to write a research paper. Each week you will be assigned to complete one part of your assignment. At the end of the semester, you will email your assignment (by December 29, 2017 Friday at 17:30).


Week 1: Foundations of Discourse Analysis: Basics

(1) Paltridge, B. (2012). Discourse analysis: An introduction (2nd ed.). London: Bloomsbury – Chapter 1
(2) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 2
(3) Fairclough, N. L. (1985). Critical and descriptive goals in discourse analysis. Journal of Pragmatics, 9, 739-763.
(4) Lazaraton, A. (2002). Quantitative and qualitative approaches to discourse analysis. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 22, 32-51.
(5) Macbeth, D. (2003). Hugh Mehan’s Learning Lessons reconsidered: On the differences between the naturalistic and critical analysis of classroom discourse. American Educational Research Journal, 40(1), 239-280.


Week 2: Foundations of Discourse Analysis: Social Theory I

(1) Lemert, C. (1999). The two sides of society: Karl Marx. In C. Lemert, Social theory: The multicultural and classic readings (2nd ed.). Boulder, CO: Westview. Pages 29-66.
(2) Lemert, C. (1999). The two sides of society: Emile Durkheim. In C. Lemert, Social theory: The multicultural and classic readings (2nd ed.). Boulder, CO: Westview. Pages 69-99.
(3) Lemert, C. (1999). The two sides of society: Max Weber. In C. Lemert, Social theory: The multicultural and classic readings (2nd ed.). Boulder, CO: Westview. Pages 99-125.
(4) Moore, J. D. (1997). Emile Durkheim: The organic society. In J. D. Moore, Visions of culture: An introduction to anthropological theories and theorists. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira. Pages 53-64.


Week 3: Foundations of Discourse Analysis: Social Theory II

(1) Moore, J. D. (1997). Claude Levi-Strauss: Structuralism. In J. D. Moore, Visions of culture: An introduction to anthropological theories and theorists. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira. Pages 211-214.
(2) Moore, J. D. (1997).Bronislaw Malinowski: The functions of culture. In J. D. Moore, Visions of culture: An introduction to anthropological theories and theorists. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira. Pages 128-140.
(3) Moore, J. D. (1997). Cllifford Geertz: An interpretive anthropology. In J. D. Moore, Visions of culture: An introduction to anthropological theories and theorists. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira. Pages 238-248.


Week 4: Foundations of Discourse Analysis: Social Theory III

(1) Tucker, K. H. (2002). Classical social theory: A contemporary approach. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers. Part III – Pages 191-253.
(2) Sandstrom, K. L., Martin, D. D., & Fine, G. A. (2001). Symbolic interactionism at the end of the century. In G. Ritzer & B. Smart (Eds.), Handbook of Social Theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(3) Dean, M. (2001). Michel Foucault: `A man in danger.’ In G. Ritzer & B. Smart (Eds.), Handbook of Social Theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(4) Elliott, A. (2001). Sexualities: Social theory and the crisis of identity. In G. Ritzer & B. Smart (Eds.), Handbook of Social Theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
(5) Kellner, D. (2001). Cultural studies and social theory: A critical intervention. In G. Ritzer & B. Smart (Eds.), Handbook of Social Theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.


Week 5: Speech Act Theory

(1) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 3
(2) Austin, J. L. (1962). How to do things with words. London: Clarendon. – Lecture I
(3) Austin, J. L. (1971). Performative-Constative. In J. R. Searle (Ed.), The philosophy of language (pp. 13-23). London: Oxford University.
(4) Searle, J. R. (1971). What is a speech act?  In J. R. Searle (Ed.), The philosophy of language (pp. 39-54). London: Oxford University.


Week 6: Interactional Sociolinguistics

(1) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 4
(2) Gumperz, J. (2015). Interactional sociolinguistics: A personal perspective. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.
(3) Vine, B., & Holmes, J., Marra, M., Pfeifer, D., & Jackson, B. (2008). Exploring co-leadership talk through interactional sociolinguistics. Leadership, 4(3), 339-360.
(4) Davies, C. E. (2003). How English-learners joke with native speakers: An interactional sociolinguistic perspective on humor as collaborative discourse across cultures. Journal of Pragmatics, 35, 1361–1385.


Week 7: The Ethnography of Communication

(1) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 5
(2) Saville-Troike, M. (2002). The ethnography of communication: An introduction (3rd ed.). Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell – Chapters 1 & 2
(3) Duff, P. A. (1995). An ethnography of communication in immersion classrooms in Hungary. TESOL Quarterly, 29(3), 505-537.
(4) Labov, W. (2015). Voices of the speech community: Six people I have learned from. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.


Week 8: Pragmatics

(1) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 6
(2) Levinson, S. C. (1983). Pragmatics. Cambridge: Cambridge University. – Chapter 1
(3) Thomas, J. A. (1995). Meaning in interaction: An introduction to pragmatics. London: Routledge. – Chapter 1


Week 9: Conversation Analysis and Ethnomethodology

(1) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 7
(2) Schegloff, E. A. (2015). Conversational interaction: The embodiment of human sociality. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.
(3) Macbeth, D. (1990). Classroom order as practical action: The making and un-making of a quiet reproach. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 11(2), 189-214.
(4) Macbeth, D. (2011). Understanding understanding as an instructional matter. Journal of Pragmatic, 43, 438–451.


Week 10: Variation Analysis

(1) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapter 8
(2) Pichler, H. (2010). Methods in discourse variation analysis: Reflections on the way forward. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 14(5), 581–608.


Week 11: Critical Discourse Analysis

(1) van Dijk, T. A. (2015). Critical discourse analysis. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.
(2) Leap, W. L. (2015). Queer linguistics as critical discourse analysis. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.
(3) Fairclough, N. (2010). Critical discourse analysis: The critical study of language. New York: Routledge. Sections A & E


Week 12: Text and Context in Discourse

(1) Schiffrin, D. (1994). Approaches to discourse. Malden, MA: Blackwell. – Chapters 8 & 9
(2) Luke, A. (1996). Text and discourse in education: An introduction to critical discourse analysis. Review of Research in Education, 21, 3-48.
(3) Rogers, R., Malancharuvil-Berkes, E., Mosley, M., Hui, D., & Joseph, G. O. (2005). Critical discourse analysis in education: A review of the literature.  Review of Educational Research, 75(3), 365–416.


Week 13: Working with Data I

(1) Bloome, D., Carter, S. P., Christian, B. M., Otto, S., & Shuart-Faris, N. (2005). Discourse analysis and the study of classroom language and literary events: A microethnographic perspective. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. – Chapter 1
(2) Erickson, F. (2015). Oral discourse as a semiotic ecology: The co-construction and mutual influence of speaking, listening and looking. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.
(3) Adger, C. T., & Wright, L. J. (2015). Discourse in educational settings. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.


Week 14: Working with Data II

(1) Stubbs, M. (2015). Computer-assisted methods of analyzing textual and intertextual competence. In D. Tannen, H. E. Hamilton & D. Schiffrin (Eds.), The Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2nd ed). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.
(2) Fairclough, N. (1993). Critical discourse analysis and the marketization of public discourse: The universities. Discourse & Society, 4(2), 133-168.